Sep 272013
 

From ApNews.com by Ralph D. Russo.

ap-logo2NEW YORK (AP) – The NCAA is now on its own in the legal battle over whether athletes should share in the money made from the use of their likenesses.

 Electronic Arts and the Collegiate Licensing Company have settled all lawsuits brought against the companies by former and current college athletes over the unauthorized use of the players’ images and likenesses in video games and other merchandise.

 The NCAA is not part of the settlements, which includes the O’Bannon case. Brought by former UCLA basketball star Ed O’Bannon, that lawsuit was asking for the NCAA, EA and CLC to share billions of dollars in revenues – including those made from massive television rights deals – with college athletes.

 The settlement was submitted for approval to the U.S. District Court in Northern California and the terms were confidential.

 “We learned of this notional settlement today,” said Donald Remy, chief legal officer for the NCAA. “We have asked for, but have not yet received, the terms so we cannot comment further.”

 Remy told USA Today in a story posted earlier that the NCAA was prepared to take the O’Bannon case and others like it to the Supreme Court.

 The other cases settled were brought by former Rutgers quarterback Ryan Hart, former Nebraska and Arizona State quarterback Sam Keller and former West Virginia running back Shawne Alston.

 “Today’s settlement is a game-changer because, for the first time, student-athletes suiting up to play this weekend are going to be paid for the use of their likenesses,” said Houston-based attorney Eugene Egdorf in a statement. Egdorf represents Hart, who sued EA Sports in 2009.

 “We view this as the first step toward our ultimate goal of making sure all student-athletes can claim their fair share of the billions of dollars generated each year by college sports,” Egdorf said.

 Seattle-based lawyer Steve Berman, who is the lead attorney on the Keller case, said that the settlement will allow attorneys to focus on claims against the NCAA.

 Read The Entire Article

Leave a Reply